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Excellence and the pursuit of polar bears.

15 October 2012
By: Lewis Pugh
Category: Excellence, Inspiration
Comments: 2
JasonRobertsProductions_ Polar Defence (24)

Your Comments:

  1. Jim Murphy
    October 17, 2012 at 5:38 am

    Wonderful Lewis! Thanks for sharing that story about excellence. When I think of courage and being fully present, I often think of you on your North Pole expedition. Keep changing the world. 🙂

  2. super slim
    July 17, 2013 at 12:49 pm

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The concept of excellence has always preoccupied great minds. Aristotle liked to say that excellence is not an act, but a habit. Former US Secretary of State Colin Powell said that, to achieve excellence in the big things, you have to develop the habit in little matters. And when English nurse Florence Nightingale was asked the secret to her brave success, she said that she ‘never gave or took any excuse’.

Which started me thinking about the pursuit of excellence, and what it really means. And I was taken back to a moment during our 2007 North Pole expedition.

We were on a ship, heading north. One of the members of our team was cameraman Chris Lotz. Chris’s brief was, among other things, to get a shot of a polar bear.

Now, you are not guaranteed to see a polar bear on the way to the North Pole. It takes seven days to get there, and seven days back again. The first two days and the last two days are through open sea, so you’ve effectively got 10 days in which to spot one.

Polar bears are white, and everything around you, all the way to the horizon, is white, so if you pass one on the ship, you might not even see it.

At the end of the second day, around dinnertime, I reminded Chris about the shot. The next day when I came in to breakfast, Chris wasn’t there. He wasn’t there again for lunch, but still I didn’t think anything of it because there were two sittings for each meal. But when he still wasn’t there at dinner, I thought, hold on, where’s Chris?

I went down to his cabin – empty. I thought he might be filming on the upper deck, but he wasn’t there. I checked in the cabin of a friend he used to visit – no luck. 24 hours had now passed and I started panicking. Had he fallen overboard?

I ran back to the upper deck of the ship again and this time I looked properly, craning my head up to take in the upper mast. And there I spotted Chris huddled behind the mast with the camera in his hand. I sprinted up 4 ladders to get to him, and ask him what he was doing.

‘Lewis,’ he said, ‘Inside the ship it’s about 25˚C. Outside it’s at least minus 25˚C. If I take this camera from inside the ship straight to the outside, that’s a drop of 50˚C, and it will mist up and possibly even break.’ He’d been keeping the camera outside, wrapped in a tarpaulin, ready to go at a minute’s notice. But that still didn’t explain the missed meals. ‘What if a polar bear was sighted while I was inside?’ Chris said. ‘It would take me precious minutes to get all my cold weather gear on before I could come outside. I couldn’t risk it. You asked me to get these pictures of a polar bear and that’s what I’m doing.’

Minutes later, a pair of polar bears walked in front of the ship – a mother and her cub. They jumped off the ice and swam across a patch of sea. Then the mother climbed out, with the cub not far behind her. It sprinted along after her as she disappeared into the horizon.

The entire scene took 25 minutes at most, and Chris got the whole thing, beginning to end.

We never saw another polar bear for the rest of the expedition.

That’s what I understand by the pursuit of excellence.

Here’s the bottom line: if you want to do a good job, the quickest way is with excellence. Because if you don’t, you’re going to have to go and do it again.

And you don’t always get that second chance.


Author: Lewis Pugh is an inspirational speaker, an ocean advocate and a pioneer swimmer. In 2010 he was named a Young Global Leader by the World Economic Forum. He will shortly be departing on a 3-year expedition to highlight the plight of the world’s oceans.

Photo Credit: Jason Roberts

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